Gardening year August flowers vegetables

GARDENING YEAR

with

Bindweed, the gardener ©

On this page we hope to keep you up to date with what to do in the garden throughout the year.


July
Gardening Year
September


AUGUST

ENGLAND

GENERAL

Tidy up time again. Remove all dead flowers, stalks and leaves. Keep the watering, mulching and hoeing going.


FLOWERS

       

Lavandula. Lavender. Labiatae stoechas (French Lavender)

Now is the time to admire your work, so do not spend all your time working in the garden, sit back and relax. However, the Antirrhinums need their flower spikes cut down. Carnations and pinks should be layered to provide new stock for next year. Clematis, honeysuckle and wisteria should be trained before the shoots become unmanageable. Dahlias for show need to be disbudded to force the energy to the flowering buds and staking with sticks surmounted with clay plant pots for earwig traps. Lavender may need trimming. Penstemons need their flower spikes cut down. Roses can still be budded to supplement next year's stock. Sweet peas need watering and a dose of liquid manure. Pick all dead heads off in your spare moments. Tulips to be moved need to be lifted and stored on their sides in trays.

SEEDS TO SOW
Sow Annuals like antirrhinums, pansies, violas, Iceland poppies for flowering next Spring need to be sown early in the month, with ten-week stock being sown towards the end of the month.

CUTTINGS
All kinds of hardy plants and bedding plants can be struck in sandy soil this month. You could say this is the cutting month. You may care to use rooting power, but it is a matter of choice. Roses such as the Bourbon China, Hybrid Perpetual and Noisette may be struck. Viola cuttings may be taken and struck. The Saxifrages should have their side shoots taken off and planted in the border or pots.

PLANTING
Amaryllis, colchicum, cyclamen, Guernsey lily and narcissi can be planted in pots or beds for next year.

CUTTINGS
Cuttings of carnations and picotees should be planted out and others potted for use as replacements. Perennial seedings should be thinned and the removed plants put in other positions in the garden. Spring flowering perennials can be divided and replanted. Now is the time to look for places in the lawn where bulbs can be planted for next Spring.

UNDER GLASS

Watering should be continued and the look out for pests heightened. Achimenes that have flowered should be placed in a frame to ripen the tubers. Azaleas need repotting. If time allows debud the Chrysanthemums. Climbing plants need cutting back. Pelargoniums need to be stood outside to ripen the wood.

SEEDS TO SOW
Annuals such as Clarkia, cyclamen, pelargoniums, schizanthus and stocks for winter flowering should be sown.

CUTTINGS
Fuchsias, pelargoniums, heliotrope, hydrangeas and all half-hardy plants and alpines such as rock plants may be used for cuttings.

POTTING
Camellias that need to moved should be done now. Calceolarias, Chinese primroses and Cinerarias in seed trays that are big enough need potting. Chrysanthemums need potting. Cyclamen should be re-potted into flowering pots. Freesias and Hyacinths for Christmas should be potted. Primulas should be divided and repotted.


VEGETABLES

The remains of crops that have been harvested should be removed and put on the compost heap. Plants, like French beans and onions can be left for next year's seed. Globe Artichokes should not be allowed to flower and should be cut down as the heads are harvested. Asparagus beds must be kept free of weeds. Cut the bearing tips unless seed is required. Broccoli will require plenty of water when the heads are forming. Cabbages can do with having a pinch of sulphate of ammonia hoed in to make them heart up. Celery should have any side shoots cut off and given water and liquid manure. Celery and leeks should be earthed up. Ridge cucumbers, tomatoes and marrows need water as required during hot weather. The fruit should be harvested when about 8 inches (20cm) long and the early cut will improve the yield. Garlic and onions can be harvested this month and then ripened. Herbs can be collected for storing. Potatoes, the early ones, that you want for next year's seed should be dug up and dried in the sun. Runner beans should be stopped when they reach the top of the poles and the fruit harvested when formed and not left on the vine. Shallots can start to be harvested. Turnips may need the fly kept in check by dusting with slake or ground lime.

SEEDS TO SOW
Cauliflowers for summer, corn salad, endive, lettuce every two weeks and onions for next year, radishes, red cabbage, spinach for winter use and turnips.

UNDER GLASS

Cucumbers may need some bottom heat and a dressing of sulphur to prevent mildew. Plants started now should fruit until Christmas. Melons beds need to be dried off as the fruit ripens.

SEEDS TO SOW
Cauliflower seeds can be started in a frame, but they should be uncovered as soon as the seed is up in order that they may harden off.


FRUIT

Fruit on walls should be exposed to the sun, but protected from wasps and birds as it ripens. Pests like earwigs and snails should be trapped. Pruning can be started and trees budded. Protection bands round tree trunks will give an idea of what pests are in the neighbourhood. Action will need to be taken against pest and mice for strawberries, raspberries, currants, loganberries and plums. Apples, pears and plums may need the fruit thinning out if the crop is heavy. Apricots, peaches and nectarines need as much sun as possible. Loganberries and raspberries should have the old canes cut down as soon as the fruit has been picked. Strawberries need the unwanted runners cut off and the old straw removed from round the crowns. New beds for the runners need to be made.

UNDER GLASS

Peaches and nectarines should be sprayed with water and given good ventilation. Fruit trees in pots should be out in the open after the fruit has been picked. Strawberries that are being used for forcing should be planted into 6-7inch (15cm) pots and given plenty of water. Watch out for wasps.


TREES AND SHRUBS

Start to tidy up by removing dead flowers and stalks from summer flowering varieties, unless they are berry producing. You should also think about leaving some things so that the birds can feed on the seeds and the changing colours and textures can add to the garden's winter displays. Do the obvious and leave the rest. What hard wood is removed should be burnt and weeds should be added to the compost heap. Hedges now are approaching their final clipping. There is just time to do those forgotten cuttings for next year, for it will all be with us again in twelve months time. Something to look forward to.


Enjoy your days in the garden.


July
Gardening Year
September


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